DEM-Simulation of Production Processes Using Geometrically Complex Particles

Goal of this part project is to evaluate the effect of material properties using numerical methods in order to optimize process control. Also, significant influences on the basic powder material during the production process will be evaluated. This includes powder application, melting of the particles with the resulting mechanical changes, to the forming of the final, macroscopic product. Here, it is important to consider the complex geometrical form of the particles and their size distribution within the powder as well as their time and process dependent changes. This includes abrasion and fracture mechanics as well as aging and modification of surface- and volume properties of the powder under the influence of spatiotemporal temperature fields generated during the melting process.

The simulation method used in this part project (discrete element method) numerically solves the equations for the translational and rotational movements of each particle in the powder. The so-called multi-sphere method will be utilized to model complex particle geometries. Here, spherical particles will be used to form “composite particles” that approximate the different, non-spherical geometries of real particles. For discrete element simulation of the production process, the open-source program LIGGGHTS will be adapted. Temporally dynamic boundary conditions will be defined in order to model the powder application mechanism (Figure 1). With the help of a simulation tool to be developed within the framework of this project an optimization approaches for the modification of the particles themselves, as well as for the processes will be developed.

Professor Pöschel
Daniel Nasato

Prof. Dr. rer. nat. habil. Dr.-Ing. Thorsten Pöschel
Lehrstuhl für Multiscale Simulation of Particulate Systems (MSS)
Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg
Nägelsbachstraße 49b
91052 Erlangen
thorsten.poeschel@fau.de

Daniel Nasato, PhD
Lehrstuhl für Multiscale Simulation of Particulate Systems (MSS)
Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg
Nägelsbachstraße 49b
91052 Erlangen
daniel.nasato@fau.de